Generalizing his coping skills

Late post from 7/26/14

kayak

This looks like an ordinary pic of a 7 year old. In my eyes and to those who know Andrew well, seeing him sitting calmly and knowing this kayak ride was free of anxiety and high energy is huge!  This Lil guy had a rough week: a traumatizing hospital procedure and a dreadful 2 hour speech therapy eval.  Through them he utilized the skills he’s been equipped with, to the best of his ability.  Before the dental procedure held at a hospital, he didn’t need assistance walking from pre-op to the the surgery room.  He did freeze in the hall where way too many staff nurses were staring at him.  Andrew crouched while clutching on his blankie, started crying and said, “There’s too many people here!!”  That’s huge!  He was a big boy and finally walked into the OR.  When the RNs finally had to carry him on to the table, he cried and said “Mommy I don’t want to go to sleep!”  It was really hard and emotional for me to watch that followed by the doctor applying the mask to his face.  I could hear him struggle and try to talk but he passed out.

During an annual speech evaluation, Andrew was pretty tired.  I made the mistake of scheduling it the same week as his procedure.  He did well overall but made a few comments like this is too long or I’m done but he kept going answering questions and working.

As his mom, who’s traveled down this road with him for 7 years, I am so proud of how much he has progressed and how hard he tries everyday to do all the things that come naturally to 7 years olds, but have to be taught to him.

Patience, patience and more patience

Today was a day of never-ending tantrums and frustration for Andrew. One of the many “minor” set offs included Anthony (younger brother) ripping the spoiler off this Indy car. No where to be found.  Andrew listened to music to calm down & later made this paper spoiler. Although he cried & screamed, he managed to resolve it independently. One of our day to day goals is to learn how to regulate the overwhelming emotions that’s 50x worse for asd kids. We’re slowly getting there. ‪#‎autismisexhausting‬ ‪#‎needtobestrong ‬‪#‎patiencepatience‬&morepatienceindy